Indian Christians forcibly converted back to Hinduism vow to continue serving Jesus
18/05/2017
The Hindu's e-book project with Juggernaut
18/05/2017
Show all

Madrasa boys add English for ease of doing business

Kieran Lobo

May 19, 2017 00:37 IST

Updated:

May 19, 2017 00:37 IST

“;
var device = “”;
for ( var type in WFClientTypeDef) {
if (window.matchMedia(WFClientTypeDef[type]).matches) {
switch (type) {
case “xlarge”:
device = ‘desktop’;
break;
case “large”:
device = ‘desktop’;
break;
case “medium”:
device = ‘tab’;
break;
case “small”:
device = ‘mobile’;
break;
}
break;
}
}
var writeOnDocument = true;
var skipOnDeviceValue = “[medium, small]”;
var noSkipOnDevice = skipOnDeviceValue.length > 0;
if(noSkipOnDevice) {
if (skipOnDeviceValue.indexOf(“large”) > -1 && ‘desktop’ == device) {
writeOnDocument = false;
}
if (skipOnDeviceValue.indexOf(“medium”) > -1 && ‘tab’ == device) {
writeOnDocument = false;
}
if (skipOnDeviceValue.indexOf(“small”) > -1 && ‘mobile’ == device) {
writeOnDocument = false;
}
}
if(writeOnDocument) {
d.write(adcode);
}
}(document);

Mumbai: The second batch of boys from a madrasa successfully passed an English language course specially designed for them by an NGO. The Indian Development Foundation (IDF) had introduced the course at a madrasa in Malvani last year. This year, it chose the Madarsa Talimul Quran in Andheri, where 68 boys emerged successful on Thursday. The IDF, which works in the space of health, education and women’s empowerment, was brought in to teach English to students who learn the Koran in Arabic. Speaking to The Hindu, IDF CEO Dr. Narayan B. Iyer said it was important to teach students English at a young age. “When they finish learning the Arabic Quran and enter the mainstream and do not know this [English], it would be too late.” The course aims to prepare students for the outside world, and teaches them the alphabet, basic grammar, framing of sentences and includes role-playing exercises such as shopping scenarios, speaking with family members and general conversation.The students, all boys, were divided into three batches based on their proficiency in English. Members of the first batch were proficient in reading, writing and speaking, and translation; the second was of those who aren’t fluent. The last batch was for beginners.Mohammed Agram, a teacher at the madrasa, said, “Urdu is not used anywhere so it becomes difficult for students. For example, if they have to make a train reservation, they have to fill a form in Hindi or English, so they need to ask for help. They have to make enquiries to even take a bus. There should be no problem in the world outside, and they shouldn’t have to seek help.” Future plansThe IDF wants more time in the school curriculum, and English classes will now be held four times a week instead of twice. Marathi classes are also being planned for the new academic year, and students will be taught basic computer skills. “We are now a digital India and no one should be left behind,” says Dr. Iyer. There are plans to familiarise students with smartphones and tablets.

Source: Bing News

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *